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The EU is heavily dependent on imports of critical raw materials from third countries, and with the growing transition to a digital economy and the increase of environmental concerns, this dependence makes supply chains vulnerable and therefore susceptible to better and more efficient regulation.

In an attempt to address this issue and providing specific dates since its first draft (see our latest Briefing here), the Critical Raw Materials Act (CRMA) has entered into force on May 23rd, 2024, establishing a framework for ensuring a secure and sustainable supply of critical raw material for the EU’s industry.

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Increase of disclosure obligations and stricter deadlines

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This briefing is the fourth in a series on the Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive (CSDDD), where BLOMSTEIN addresses the key aspects that (in)directly affect businesses both within and outside the EU, explores its interplay with the existing legislation in Germany (LkSG) and examines interactions with other recently adopted EU legislation (e.g., EUDR and CSRD) which partially set overlapping obligations.

In today’s briefing we explore the main differences and points of convergence of the CSDDD and the Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD), particularly which companies might be affected by both and how to reconcile them.

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This briefing gives a short overview of the latest developments in the national German hydrogen strategy. The German government has recently passed the Hydrogen Acceleration Act (Wasserstoffbeschleunigungsgesetz, WasserstoffBG), acknowledging the urgency of a decarbonisation of the German industry sector. We will address the key aspects of the draft legislation.

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As announced in January, BLOMSTEIN is publishing a series of briefings introducing into European and German legal defence matters. In our last briefing, we gave an overview over EU funding opportunities for defence and security projects and focused specifically on the legal remedies available against grant allocation decisions in the context of EU defence funding.

This edition is on new funding opportunities for the defence and security sector provided by the European Investment Bank (EIB). The EIB, an institution of the European Union, stands as one of the foremost financiers of climate-related initiatives. Since its inception in 1958, the EIB has extended loans and expert advice to thousands of projects across more than 160 countries. The EIB is dedicated to promoting sectors that significantly enhance growth, employment, regional cohesion, and environmental sustainability within Europe and globally. Recognizing the increasing importance of security in Europe, the EIB has revised its statutes this year to explicitly incorporate security-related activities within the scope of its financing capabilities.

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This briefing is the third in a series on the Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive (CSDDD), where BLOMSTEIN addresses the key aspects that (in)directly affect businesses both within and outside the EU, explores its interplay with the existing legislation in Germany (LkSG) and examines interactions with other recently adopted EU legislation (e.g., EUDR and CSRD) which partially set overlapping obligations.

In today’s briefing we explore the main differences and points of convergence of the CSDDD and the European Union Regulation on Deforestation-free products (EUDR), particularly which companies might be affected by both and how to leverage synergies when implementing compliance procedures.

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As announced in January, BLOMSTEIN is publishing a series of briefings introducing into European and German legal defence matters. In our last briefing, we gave an overview over the legal framework for joint procurements in the fields of defence and security.

This edition EU funding opportunities for defence and security projects and focuses specifically on the legal remedies available against grant allocation decisions in the context of EU defence funding.

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This briefing is second in a series on the Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive (CSDDD), which addresses the key aspects that (in)directly affect businesses both within and outside the EU, explore its interplay with the existing legislation in Germany and examine interactions with other  recently adopted acts of EU legislation (e.g., EUDR and CSRD), which partially establish overlapping obligations.

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Go green go

13.05.2024

Sustainability and competition law has been a hotly debated topic. While some competition authorities have dedicated specific guidelines for cooperations among competitors in the name of sustainability, the German Federal Cartel Office (FCO) has been adamant that it will adopt a case-by-case approach and that guidance can only be derived from specific precedents. It has continuously invited companies to bring forward specific cases - and sometimes the president of the FCO, Andreas Mundt, jokingly even questioned whether there was really such a big need for guidance given the low numbers of precedents on which the FCO‘s position was actively requested. Last week, the FCO finally had another chance to provide its assessment and expressed its support for a project introducing a reusable system in the plant trade sector to reduce plastic waste (see press release).

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As announced in January, BLOMSTEIN is publishing a series of briefings introducing into European and German legal defence matters. In our last briefing, we have provided some insight into the regulatory framework for the defence industry to produce and sell from the EU.

The cooperation of EU Member States regarding defence and security policy and activities ranks high on the European Union’s agenda. This includes EU Member States’ joint procurement of military and sensitive equipment within the meaning of Directive 2009/81 on procurements in the fields of defence and security. Advantages of such joint procurements to national procedures are manifold, including cost reductions through scale economies, facilitated in-use collaboration due to increased interoperability of material and a strengthening of allies.

This briefing gives an overview over the legal framework of such joint procurements. In practice, EU Member States assign the task of procuring equipment from suppliers (mainly private companies) to a single entity (Executive Entity), which, in turn, conducts the procurement for (the benefit of) all participating EU Member States. Candidates for the role as Executive Entity are, firstly, states – participating EU Member States or third countries – acting as a “lead nation”. However, multinational institutions such as the European Defence Agency (EDA), NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) or Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en Matière d’Armement (OCCAR) can also take on this role.

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